Second wave of coronavirus infections sweeping South Korea confirmed

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South Korean health officials are bracing for a second wave of coronavirus infections despite relatively low recorded infections.

The country took drastic measures when the epidemic became apparent, which helped them deal with the Covid-19 outbreak successfully. Experts in the region now say the pandemic may continue for months longer than predicted.

“The first wave lasted up until April yet since May, clusters of new cases have grown, including outbreaks at nightclubs in the capital, Seoul.” Said Jung Eun-Kyeong, who is head of the Korean Center for Disease Control.

The regions daily confirmed cases fell from 989 to zero infections recorded for three consecutive days.

Those successful results did not continue as 17 new cases were recorded in a 24 hour period. The majority of those new infections were believed to be from large offices and warehouses, officials confirmed on Monday. 

COVID-19 tests being conducted on South Korean citizens.

As widespread fears of a second wave were suspected from the new infections, the KCDC said that South Korea’s first wave had never really ended, as it would be extremely difficult to determine whether anyone was infected without knowing it. 

The city of Daejeon has announced it would ban gatherings in public places including libraries and museums due to a number of virus clusters being discovered in such places.

Park won-soon, The mayor of Seoul has warned that the capital may have to return to strict social distancing if infection rates rise to 30 on average over the next three days and the bed occupancy rate of the city’s hospitals exceeds 70%.

The country managed to avoid locking down the entire region by relying on voluntary social distancing measures combined with a track, trace and test strategy to combat the virus from spreading.  

South Korea’s current figures stand at  12,484 confirmed cases with 281 fatalities and a remaining 1,295 active cases.